Tag Archives: community garden

Volunteers Remove Downed Tree at Community Garden

The recent ice storm that saw Meaford and the surrounding area lose power for several hours, and left tree branches scattered across lawns, parks, and local roads, also downed a 30 year old Pussy Willow tree living in the Georgian Bay Secondary School (GBSS) Community Garden.

Eight volunteers put it’s remains to rest on Saturday April 27.

On the day that marked the end of National Volunteer Week, April 21st-27th, citizens demonstrated once again just how much they care about our community.

“A simple call went out for help; a man with a chainsaw, a farmer willing to lend his utility trailer and eight individuals showed up ready to work,” says local volunteer Lindy Iversen, “Even the threat of rain didn’t keep people away.”

Environmental students and community gardeners are waiting anxiously to get their hands in the soil.

The GBSS greenhouse is filled with young plants; seeded in late February and growing under the watchful care of the students.

In exchange for personal plots, gardeners from the community tend the food bank garden during the summer months.

“Since Pussy Willow trees with their furry little buds are the harbingers of spring; it is fair to say that it won’t be long before we’re planting,” said Iversen, “To the eight people, who worked on the tree removal, a sincere thank you on behalf of Transition Meaford, the Golden Town Outreach Food Bank and the Environmental class at GBSS. We count ourselves lucky to be the recipients of your goodwill in action.”

Two citizen plots are still available at the Community Garden, those interested can contact Mary 538-2558 or Lindy 538-0167.

© http://www.themeafordindependent.ca/news/community-news/3007-volunteers-remove-downed-tree-at-community-garden

Georgian Bay Secondary School community garden news

comm_garden3Spring is almost here and for the third year in a row, tenants of the Georgian Bay Secondary School (GBSS) community garden are planning for the new season.

The GBSS community garden came into being as a result of a cooperative effort between interested students, the Meaford Golden Town Outreach and Transition Meaford. Individual plots are tended by community members who also donate time and effort to the maintenance of the Meaford Outreach plot.

The focus this year will be to establish a communal rhubarb patch, berry bushes, tomato plot, a tree nursery which will eventually be to the benefit of Memorial Park, and the creation of raised garden beds.

In keeping with the spirit of the document “Sustainability Meaford, Engagement Summary and Policy Recommendations”, plans are in the making to establish another two community gardens.

“I believe that we can create a more resilient, self-sufficient food production and consumption system that does not depend on far-off lands to sustain us and that surely meets the needs of all our community members” says Jaden Calvert.
Jaden is an enthusiastic proponent of sustainable living and consumption of locally grown food. He organized last year’s GBSS community garden plant sale, an event where gardeners can buy plants adapted to local conditions with the aim of growing high quality food in an environmentally friendly manner. The sale was successful for all concerned and Jaden will provide quality plants for sale again this year.

Anyone interested in learning more about community gardening?
Please call Lindy (519.538.0167) or Mary (519.538.2558)

Plans for Meaford’s community garden at Georgian Bay Secondary School are underway

As we move into the second year of this project we feel lucky that the ECO class (Environment, Community and Outdoors) have again, welcomed the community into their ‘backyard’.

Golden Town Outreach Food Bank and Transition Meaford, partners in this venture are looking forward to an early planting in the shared veggie patch.

The garden is the classroom to Mark Grahlman, soil expert and local organic farmer. Huddling with students over a patch of soil is second nature to Mark. Again this year, he will volunteer practical advice and guidance.

In keeping with the guiding principles of the ECO class the  goal is to reduce the carbon footprint and nurture the soil’s microbial community.

Since gas roto-tillers increase our carbon footprint and create tsunami-like devastation to the microbial community living in the soil; the roto-tiller is out and digging forks are in.

At different layers in the soil you find different microorganisms. The digging forks will be used to manually aerate the soil and cause minimal disturbance to the layers; a gentle soil lifting without turning. This organic farming practice is essential for enhancing long term soil health and productivity.

“We’re thrilled with this year’s plan for individual plots. The willingness of students to help with some of the more demanding aeration of the soil is heart-warming. We appreciate the need to strengthen our connections with theECO class.” commented Mary Bryant, the local food bank representative.

There are a limited number of individual plots available to people who see value in joining this leading edge approach to organic gardening.

In keeping with the generosity of the high school, the only cost to a ‘citizen gardener” is sweat equity and a willingness to share some of their produce with the food bank.

Once again, the local food bank will be the beneficiary of the produce grown by the ECO class.

Youth are leading the way with their earth-friendly and community-minded plans for the 2012 shared garden.

Definitions of success have evolved beyond the harvest!

Interested in being a citizen gardener?  Call Lindy 538-0167 or Mary 538-2558